One Point

By Insider – Suzanne Peri-Chapman

I was in the Eden Park stadium on the final night of the Rugby World Cup 2011 Tournament. Not only in the stadium, but, as part of my duties, in the players tunnel area during the last quarter of the match. The volume of sound from the crowd was extraordinary – every move on the field was matched by a roar from 62,000 people; whether All Black fans en masse or the few determined French fans. Looking around the stadium, everyone was wearing black, as is always the case with Kiwi fans, although occasional brave blobs of French Tricolour could be seen in groups in the crowd.

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Hard on the Heels

By Insider – Suzanne Peri-Chapman

Hard on the Heels, Peter Bush, Capturing the All Blacks

Closing on October 30, this photography exhibition at the Museum of Wellington City and Sea is well worth a look. Peter Bush has been photographing the All Blacks for over 50 years, and he achieved extraordinary access – sometimes by guile, sometimes by hard work, sometimes by sheer good fortune. Starting in 1949 as a news photographer for the New Zealand Herald, he went on to specialise in rugby. As he says “This was that wonderful period before television and video images shifted the still photographers off the privileged perch we had occupied for the last 50 years.”

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Everyone’s an expert now

By Insider – Suzanne Peri-Chapman

There’s a new Rugby World Cup phenomenon around, and no it isn’t how far the French managed to get. This phenomenon is  a sort of confessional appearing in workplaces around the country…the conversation generally runs along the lines of “I never usually watch rugby, but…” followed by an impassioned discourse on that red card to Wales, Ireland beating the pants off the Aussies, how impressive the AB’s young guns are, or the finer points of a rolling maul. Continue reading

Brahmissimo

By Insider – Suzanne Peri-Chapman

I was sitting in the concert hall tonight, thinking “My life is being enriched, right now”. I was attending the first of four concerts by the New Zealand Symphony Orchestra, called Brahmissimo, a complete Brahms experience. These concerts are exclusive to Wellington, so can I just say now, before I go into any further detail…don’t miss it! Concert dates are 12-15 October, in the Michael Fowler Centre.

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Martinborough Unmasked

By Insider – Suzanne Peri-Chapman

Excellent idea, this unmasking of Martinborough. For those of you who don’t know where, or what, Martinborough is..click here. For those who do – it’s that little piece of paradise, just out of Wellington, with a drive over the Rimutakas that’s just tricky enough to make you feel you’ve really achieved something when you get there. The home of NZ wine, NZ Olive Oil and general NZ loveliness.

Martinborough Unmasked is a new event, that could well become an annual one, especially if attached to some of the existing festivals that occur in the region. The brainchild of Gretchen Bunny, the idea is that you get a “behind the scenes” tour from various local good sports who have generously opened their vineyards, olive groves and galleries to the tourists.

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Maori Art Market

By Insider – Suzanne Peri-Chapman 

The Maori Art Market is on from the 6-9 of October, in Porirua, just a short drive north of Wellington. It features over 200 Maori visual artists, and the works are of a consistently high standard. There are traditional art forms, however there is also a wonderful range of contemporary works, with strong Maori influences shown in new ways – very exciting.

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Arohanui, The Greatest Love

By Insider – Suzanne Peri-Chapman

I’ve just been to the World Premiere of Arohanui, The Greatest Love, in Wellington. Not to be missed – it has a short season in Wellington, then it moves on to Auckland.

As a genre, it has to be called Kapa Theatre, taking the power of Kapa Haka into a new dimension. Powerful is a word that immediately comes to mind during this performance – as you might expect it has the well-known strength of Maori cultural performance, but it has an unusual softness and tenderness in places, and a good dynamic range.

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